Experience sampling software ‘mobileQ’: new, free, open source

Peter Kuppens is Professor of Psychology at KU Leuven-University of Leuven in Belgium. He studies the nature and dynamics of emotions in their natural habitat, daily life, and how they play a role in well-being and mood disorder. His research group has developed an Android smartphone platform, called mobileQ, to …

Idiography: Where have we come from, where should we go to?

Marilyn Piccirillo (email) is a graduate student in the Washington University Clinical Science Ph.D. program. She is primarily interested in idiographic methodology and how psychologists can implement these methods into clinical and applied settings. Recently, she authored two papers on idiography in collaboration with her mentor – Tom Rodebaugh – …

Fixed-margin sampling & networks: New commentary on network replicability

This guest blog post was written by Sacha Epskamp, Assistant Professor at the University of Amsterdam. It does not necessarily reflect the opinions of other authors on the paper introduced below.   The methodological journal Multivariate Behavioral Research just published our latest contribution to the debate surrounding the replicability of …

(Mis)interpreting Networks: An Abbreviated Tutorial on Visualizations

This guest post was written by Payton Jones (payton_jones@g.harvard.edu), and is the abbreviated version of a tutorial published in Frontiers recently (“Visualizing Psychological Networks: A Tutorial in R“). Payton is a graduate student at Harvard University in the Richard J. McNally lab. His research focuses on the etiology of mental …

New paper on the role of stabilizing and communicating symptoms

This guest post was written by Tessa F. Blanken and Marie K. Deserno who are both PhD-students associated with the Psychosystems Lab at the University of Amsterdam. They secretly meet up every Friday to vividly discuss potential extensions of the network analysis toolbox. This post summarizes a new paper available …

Collection of PTSD network papers & recent conference talks

This guest post was written by Tobias Spiller (tobias.r.spiller@gmail.com) who recently finished Medical School at the University of Zurich. Tobias has published a paper using network analysis with a refugee sample and currently works on several other network analytic projects. Last year, 15 articles using network analytic methods in PTSD/psychotraumatology …

The expanded network approach: moving beyond symptoms?

This guest post was written by Payton Jones (payton_jones@g.harvard.edu) and Haley Elliott (haleyelliott@college.harvard.edu), and is based on a recent letter in which they highlight the importance of non-symptom variables in psychological networks. Payton is a graduate student at Harvard University in the Richard J. McNally lab. His research focuses on …

Presentations of IMPS 2017 Zurich

This guest post was written by Sacha Epskamp (sacha.epskamp@gmail.com) who recently finished his PhD on Network Psychometrics at the University of Amsterdam. Sacha is well known for his various contributions to the development and application of network models, and for his numerous R-packages such as qgraph. As rain and students …

Two new papers on predictability of symptom networks

This guest post was written by Jonas Haslbeck (jonas.haslbeck@gmail.com) who is a PhD student in the Psychosystems lab at the University of Amsterdam. Symptom networks have become popular in clinical psychology because they promise to provide insights into the topology and dynamics of mental disorders. Most analyses so far focused …

Tutorial paper on new methods for estimating psychological networks

This guest post was written by Giulio Costantini (costantinigiulio@gmail.com) who recently finished his PhD at the University of Milan Bicocca. His blog describes a new tutorial paper that was just published in Personality and Individual Differences (PDF), and follows his earlier 2015 tutorial paper on estimating psychological networks. In a …