Two new papers on predictability of symptom networks

This guest post was written by Jonas Haslbeck (jonas.haslbeck@gmail.com) who is a PhD student in the Psychosystems lab at the University of Amsterdam. Symptom networks have become popular in clinical psychology because they promise to provide insights into the topology and dynamics of mental disorders. Most analyses so far focused …

Tutorial paper on new methods for estimating psychological networks

This guest post was written by Giulio Costantini (costantinigiulio@gmail.com) who recently finished his PhD at the University of Milan Bicocca. His blog describes a new tutorial paper that was just published in Personality and Individual Differences (PDF), and follows his earlier 2015 tutorial paper on estimating psychological networks. In a …

The network approach to psychopathology: pitfalls, challenges, and future directions

After Angelique Cramer and colleagues published the first paper on empirical networks for psychopathology in 2010, a few years of great enthusiasm followed, and psychological network science felt a bit like the Wild West: Everything was possible, and it was difficult to find qualified reviewers due to the novelty of …

Network analysis innovations at APS Boston 2017: summary and slides

APS 2017 in Boston just ended, with plenty of insightful talks about new developments in network methodology and application of network analysis to substantive topics. For those of you who couldn’t be there, I wanted to provide a summary of the topics that were discussed, and upload all presentations I …

Network replicability: a cross-cultural PTSD study across of clinical datasets

Let’s start with a teaser: This blog post is a summary of the first psychological network study ever looking at the replicability of network models in 4 datasets, with a total N of 2,782 (Preprint). The paper is fully reproducible, and includes the covariance matrices of the four datasets so …

Public time-series data of 40 outpatients (21 items, 130 measurements)

This guest post was written by Aaron Fisher (afisher@berkeley.edu) who is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and the Director of the Idiographic Dynamics Lab at the University of California, Berkeley. Aaron argues for a shift from nomothetic to idiographic research, and describes a new dataset he made publicly available for …

Public dataset with 1478 timepoints over 239 consecutive days

A new paper entitled “Data from ‘Critical Slowing Down as a Personalized Early Warning Signal for Depression’” was published by Jolanda Kossakowski and colleagues yesterday. The paper was published in the new Journal of Open Psychology Data that you may want to keep an eye on. They publish datasets, which …

Tutorial: how to review psychopathology network papers

The network literature on psychopathology is exploding, which means there are many reviews to be performed. I’m sure colleagues such as Denny Borsboom or Angélique Cramer have read and reviewed many more papers over the years than I did, but I did my share: 46 reviews since 2015. Many of …

The meaning of model equivalence: Network models, latent variables, and the theoretical space in between

This guest post was written by Denny Borsboom (dennyborsboom@gmail.com), University of Amsterdam, in response to a recent discussion on the equivalence of latent variable and network models. Recently, an important set of equivalent representations of the Ising model was published by Joost Kruis and Gunter Maris in Scientific Reports. The …

How theoretically distinct mechanisms can generate identical observations

This guest post was written by Joost Kruis (j.kruis@uva.nl) and summarizes the paper entitled “Three representations of the Ising model” published recently in Scientific Reports. Joost works in the Psychological Methods Department at the University of Amsterdam. The first sentence of the ‘About’ section on this website (and for that …